Explanation of Teach-In Assignments during the last two weeks of History 383: You have all been put into one of ten specific groups - as shown below - and you will work in these groups to complete the oral portion of the final two required assignments for History 383.

GROUP 1: Marina, Lily, Emily, Aisellyn

GROUP 2: Rodney, Axel, Christina*, Kevin, Margaret (Christina may be absent so Margaret has been added to the group)

GROUP 3: Ryan, Shelby, Mitchell, Ariana

GROUP 4: Jesse, Kayla, Aaron, Sierra, Diego

GROUP 5: Michael, Patrick Southland, Jeremy, Amy

GROUP 6: Max, Peter, Raul, Chad

GROUP 7: Taylor, Elyse, Perla, Brandon

GROUP 8: Christopher, Patrick Cardenas,. Justin, Eric Nunez

GROUP 9: Julian, Phillip, Paige Corey, Evan

GROUP 10: Gemma, Alicia, Paige Hile, Jaime

Following are the assignments and the expectations for the last two weeks:

Week #1: No class on December 1 and Required Assignment #2 due on December 3 (30 points). Follow the directions below:

  1. On your own and before coming to class on December 3, each member in Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9 will watch one of four parts of the documentary Chicano! History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Groups 5 and 10 will watch The Zoot Suit Riiots.
  2. On your own and before coming to class, each person must answer the following questions related to their assigned video. The typewritten answers to the questions must be turned in at the end of class.
    • Groups 1 and 6 questions for Part 1: Quest for a Homeland
      • What was/is this "quest for a homeland" and how is it relevant to the beginning of the Chicano movement?
      • Describe Tijerina's fight to convince the federal government to honor the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848). How and why did it help galvanize Mexicans and Mexican Americans across the Southwest?
      • How did Rodolfo (Corky) Gonzales and his Crusade for Justice reach out to Chicano youth? Why do you think it was so successful?
      • What are the 2-4 most important points made in this part of your video - points that everyone should understand about the Chicano quest for a homeland?
  3. When you come to class, Groups 1 and 6 will meet, Groups 2 and 7 will meet, Groups 3 and 8 will meet, Groups 4 and 9 will meet and Groups 5 and 10 will meet. Each of the five new and larger groups will take 15 minutes to determine the 3 most important things you learned from the video you watched. Each person must write these down and understand these well enough to teach it to classmates in a smaller group.
  4. When you are done in these groups, reconfigure yourselves into the eight groups shown below. Each of the five persons will have seen one of the required videos so that each groups has a person who has seen Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of Chicano and The Zoot Suit Riots. Each person will take 5 minutes to teach their chapter to their classmates using the three most important points discussed in the previous group.

    GROUP 1: Marina, Rodney, Ryan, Jesse, Michael

    GROUP 2: Max, Taylor, Christopher, Julian, Gemma

    GROUP 3: Lily, Axel, Shelby, Kayla, Patrick Southland

    GROUP 4: Peter, Elyse, Patrick Cardenas, Phillip, Alicia, Diego

    GROUP 5: Emily, Christina, Margaret, Mitchell, Aaron, Jeremy

    GROUP 6: Raul, Perla, Justin, Paige Corey, Paige Hile

    GROUP 7: Aisellyn, Kevin, Ariana, Sierra, Amy

    GROUP 8: Chad, Brandon, Eric Nunez, Evan, Jaime

  5. Once everyone has discussed their video, take another 10 minutes to decide what 3-5 themes all the videos had in common in regard to the historical Chicano movement and the Zoot Suit Riots. Elect a spokesperson to be ready to contribute your group's findings to the entire class.
  6. Come together as an entire class. Your professor will ask each of the groups to discuss their themes. The final discussion will be how the findings of each group compared and contrasted.
  7. When class is over, be sure to turn in your required written assignment.

Week #2: No class on December 8 and Required Assignment #3 due on December 10 (30 points). Follow the directions below:

  1. On your own and before coming to class on December 10, each member in Groups 1-10 as indicated in Assignment #2 above - read one of five final chapters in Wherever There's a Fight as follows
    • Groups 1 and 6 - Ch. 4 "Under Cover of Law: the Fight for Racial Equality."
    • Groups 2 and 7 - Ch. 5, "Holding Up Half the Sky: The Rights of Women"
    • Groups 3 and 8 - Ch. 6, "The Right Not to Remain Silent: Dissent"
    • Groups 4 and 9 - Ch. 9, "That Dare Not Speak its Name: The Rights of Lesbians, Gay Men, Bisexuals, and Transgender People"
    • Groups 5 and 10 -Ch. 10, "Breaking Down Barriers: The Rights of People with disabilities"
  2. On your own and before coming to class, each person must answer the following questions related to their assigned chapter. The typewritten answers to the questions must be turned in at the end of class.
    • Ch. 4,"Under Color of Law: The Fight for Racial Equality"
      • What do you think was the most compelling court case discussed in this chapter? Why was it so compelling?
      • What role did segregation play in the first 150 years of California's history?
      • Had you ever heard about the Port Chicago Naval Base disaster of 1944 prior to reading this chapter? Why do you think this incident is not generally taught or explained in school? What do you think is the most important outcome of this incident? Why?
      • What are restrictive covenents and what role did they play in California history?
      • What do you think were the 3-5 most important overall themes that the authors wanted you to learn in this chapter?
      • What did this chapter contribute to your understanding of the struggle for civil rights in California?
    • Ch. 5, "Holding Up Half the Sky: The Rights of Women"
      • On page 172, the authors ask "Why was there not widespread opposition ot the trafficking of young Chinese women?" Given what you read in the chapter and what you have already learned in this class, how would you respond to their question? Why?
      • How did women's roles in California change before, during, and after World War II?
      • What was the most surprising thing you read about in this chapter in regard to the rights of women? Why was it so surprising?
      • What do you think were the 3-5 most important overall themes that the authors wanted you to learn in this chapter?
      • Who were the 2-3 most important persons in your chapter that you believe contributed most to your civil rights issue? How and why?
      • What did this chapter contribute to your understanding of the struggle for civil rights in California?
    • Ch. 6, "The Right Not to Remain Silent: Dissent"
      • What was the most surprising thing you read about in this chapter in regard to the right to dissent in California? Why was it so surprising?
      • On page 218, the authors state that "Although the Supreme Court had found the red flag law unconstitutional and prosecutions under the criminal syndicalism law effectively ended in 1924, government obstruction of Californians' political activities continued unabated." Provide evidence from the remainder of the chapter to show how and why the authors' statement is accurate.
      • Who were the Hollywood Ten and why is their story so important to understanding the role of dissent in American society?
      • What do you think were the 3-5 most important overall themes that the authors wanted you to learn in this chapter?
      • Who were the 2-3 most important persons in your chapter that you believe contributed most to your civil rights issue? How and why?
      • What did this chapter contribute to your understanding of the struggle for civil rights in California?
    • Ch. 9, "That Dare Not Speak its Name: The Rights of Lesbians, Gay Men, Bisexuals, and Transgender People"
      • What was the most surprising thing you read about in this chapter in regard to the rights of LGBT people in California? Why was it so surprising?
      • Of all the legal cases discussed in this chapter, which do you think was most instrumental in changing the lives of California's LGBT population? How and why?
      • Summarize the major state and local laws that Californians have passed since 1850 that deal with gay men and women, bisexuals, and transgender people.
      • What do you think were the 3-5 most important overall themes that the authors wanted you to learn in this chapter?
      • Who were the 2-3 most important persons in your chapter that you believe contributed most to your civil rights issue? How and why?
      • What did this chapter contribute to your understanding of the struggle for civil rights in California?
    • Ch. 10, "Breaking Down Barriers: The Rights of People with disabilities"
      • What was the most surprising thing you read about in this chapter in regard to the rights of people with disabilities in California? Why was it so surprising?
      • Of all the legal cases discussed in this chapter, which do you think was most instrumental in changing the lives of California's disabled population? How and why?
      • How has the legal definition of "disability" changed in both the federal and state legal system? How did these changes occur?
      • What do you think were the 3-5 most important overall themes that the authors wanted you to learn in this chapter?
      • Who were the 2-3 most important persons in your chapter that you believe contributed most to your civil rights issue? How and why?
      • What did this chapter contribute to your understanding of the struggle for civil rights in California?
  3. When you come to class, Groups 1 and 6 will meet, Groups 2 and 7 will meet, Groups 3 and 8 will meet, Groups 4 and 9 will meet and Groups 5 and 10 will meet. Each of the five new and larger groups will take 15 minutes to address the questions below. Each person must write these down and understand these well enough to teach it to classmates in a smaller group.
    • What do you think were the 3-5 most important overall themes in this chapter - themes that you believe your classmates who did not read this chapter must understand about your civil rights issue?
    • Who were the 2-3 most important persons in your chapter whom you believe contributed most to your civil rights issue? How and why?
    • What did this chapter contribute to your understanding of the struggle for civil rights in California?
  4. When you are done in these groups, reconfigure yourselves into the eight groups as shown in Assignment #2 above. Now, you must make 8 groups of 5 persons each. Each of the five persons will have read one of the five chapters in Wherever There's a Fight. Each person will take 5 minutes to teach their chapter to their answers to the questions in #3 above to guide their discussion.
  5. Once everyone has discussed their chapter, take another 10 minutes to decide what 3-5 themes were common in all five chapters. Elect a spokesperson to be ready to contribute your group's findings to the entire class.
  6. Come together as an entire class. Your professor will ask each of the groups to discuss their overall themes.
  7. When class is over, be sure to turn in your typewritten answers to your written assignment.